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Hand job anyone?

Why it's time to close your laptop and put pen to paper



BOB BURG’S BEEN ON.


The Wall Street Journal best-selling author joined us via Zoom just a few nights ago.


Bob was great. He oozed wisdom as he responded copiously to questions from my local networking group on his book, The Go-Giver.


In case you don’t know, The Go-Giver is a parable of business success built on giving and adding value to others. Published in 2007, it feels oddly topical for our post-pandemic world.



Handwritten gratitude. Photo: Pixabay



Live from Florida, Bob told us he’s a big fan of sending handwritten ‘thank you’ notes. Why? Because the act of putting pen to paper and popping your inky squiggles into the post is tangible evidence of your gratitude.


As soon as you’re reminded of this you immediately think, hell yeah, of course receiving a handwritten note in the post is better than the same words pinging into your inbox.


Why mat feels so unloved


For starters, anything coming through the post is something of a rarity these days. I mean, if my welcome mat could speak, I’m sure it would tell me it feels like an orphan. Or it may just say that emails and other digital messages have ruined its bristly life. Either way, it's not a happy mat.


It’s not just recipients who benefit from messages written by hand. The writer is also rewarded for their efforts.


So says an article published by the British Library.


Briefly, the article tells us that handwriting has a beneficial effect on the workings of the brain.


Which makes a hell of a lot of sense when you come to think of it.


We know that doing stuff – practising a sport, moving chess pieces, crocheting a hat – can alter the brain. That’s how people get good at stuff. That’s how, seemingly without thinking, chefs can conjure plates of food that look like art. And how surgeons can poke around your innards, slicing away any nasty bits, without having to google the words ‘how to remove a cancerous growth’. We practise, our brains alter. As the British Library article puts it:


‘Studies suggest that by writing our work by hand we enable information to be processed at greater depth. For example, students who took lecture notes by hand recalled more of the content after a month than those who used laptops. Similarly, narratives of children and adolescents contained more ideas, more complex sentence structures and more varied vocabulary when they were handwritten rather than spoken.’


Remember to write


I didn’t ask Bob if he wrote his book by hand. But I do know that he remembered a hell of a lot of detail from a text he published 14 years ago.


Which brings me to the upcoming National Writing Day, which takes place tomorrow. National Writing Day is a celebration of writing per se, not handwriting specifically. But if you did want to have an actual mind-bending experience, and be better remembered by a recipient, you could use 24 June as a good excuse for putting pen to paper.


Thanks for reading.


#copywriter #copywriting #ContentWriter #NationalWritingDay

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